More than a feeling: Measurement of sonic user experience and psychophysiology in a first-person shooter game

Document type: Journal Articles
Article type: Original article
Peer reviewed: Yes
Author(s): Lennart Nacke, Mark Grimshaw, Craig Lindley
Title: More than a feeling: Measurement of sonic user experience and psychophysiology in a first-person shooter game
Translated title: More than a feeling: Measurement of sonic user experience and psychophysiology in a first-person shooter game
Journal: Interacting with Computers
Year: 2010
Volume: 22
Issue: 5 Sp. Iss. SI
Pagination: 336-343
ISSN: 0953-5438
Publisher: ELSEVIER
URI/DOI: 10.1016/j.intcom.2010.04.005
ISI number: 000281077600004
Organization: Blekinge Institute of Technology
Department: School of Computing (Sektionen för datavetenskap och kommunikation)
School of Computing S-371 79 Karlskrona
+46 455 38 50 00
http://www.bth.se/com
Authors e-mail: len@cs.usask.ca, craig.lindley@bth.se
Language: English
Abstract: The combination of psychophysiological and psychometric methods provides reliable measurements of
affective user experience (UX). Understanding the nature of affective UX in interactive entertainment,
especially with a focus on sonic stimuli, is an ongoing research challenge. In the empirical study reported
here, participants played a fast-paced, immersive first-person shooter (FPS) game modification, in which
sound (on/off) and music (on/off) were manipulated, while psychophysiological recordings of electrodermal
activity (EDA) and facial muscle activity (EMG) were recorded in addition to a Game Experience
Questionnaire (GEQ). Results indicate no main or interaction effects of sound or music on EMG and
EDA. However, a significant main effect of sound on all GEQ dimensions (immersion, tension, competence,
flow, negative affect, positive affect, and challenge) was found. In addition, an interaction effect
of sound and music on GEQ dimension tension and flow indicates an important relationship of sound
and music for gameplay experience. Additionally, we report the results of a correlation between GEQ
dimensions and EMG/EDA activity. We conclude subjective measures could advance our understanding
of sonic UX in digital games, while affective tonic (i.e., long-term psychophysiological) measures of sonic
UX in digital games did not yield statistically significant results. One approach for future affective psychophysiological
measures of sonic UX could be experiments investigating phasic (i.e., event-related) psychophysiological
measures of sonic gameplay elements in digital games. This could improve our
general understanding of sonic UX beyond affective gaming evaluation.
Subject: Digital Game Development\General
Human Work Science\Human Computer Interaction
Psychology\General
Keywords: Psychophysiology, Sonic user experience (UX), Entertainment, Emotion, Affective gaming, Action video games
Note: Volume 22 Issue 5 (Special Issue on User Experience) Available online 20 April 2010.
Edit