Here we will list courses for PhD Students! You can add a course to the list by sending an email to Tony Thompson (ath@bth.se) with course information including course name, dates the course is offered, course contact, and a link to the course desriptor.

 

 


 

Forskningsdesign med tillämpningar inom interdisciplinär forskning 7,5 högskolepoäng


Research Design with Applications within Inter-disciplinary Research 7,5 credits

 

 


Information Retrieval for Doctoral Students

3 ECTS credits is still open for registration
The aim of the course is to develop the participant´s information literacy, which will say, their ability to search, critically evaluate and use information during the process of writing their thesis.

The following main topics will be dealt with during the course:

· Search strategies
· Information sources (web-based search services – databases,  general and subject specific)
· Scientific publication and communication
· Copyright and intellectual property
· Reference management (EndNote)
· Systematic/Literature reviews
· Information retrieval and literature coverage

Date of first session:  Wednesday September 8th, 13-16 Runda Rummet in the Library, Karlskrona.  The course will be given at a 10 % rate of study every second wednesday from 8/9 -10 until 26/1 2011.  You will find the course plan and course literature at the following address: http://edu.bth.se/utbildning/utb_kurstillfalle.asp?KtAnmKod=D0034&Kt

Registration at the course:  https://www.studera.nu/aw/freeTextSearchResult.do?period=HT%202010&freeText=BTH-D0034&lang=sv

Responsible for the course and your contact persons are:
Eva Norling, 0457-385132, 0709-221540, eva.norling@bth.se
Sofia Swartz, 0457-385129, sofia.swartz@bth.se


Vetenskapsteorikursen

Vetenskapsteorikursen på BTH har getts sedan 1997. Den finansieras av
fakulteten.

Doktorander, lärare, personal och avancerade studenter är välkomna.

Kursen löper nu över helår med start i september 2010 och avslutning i mars
2011.

De som så önskar kan komplettera kursen med en högskolepedagogiskt
meriterande del under april-maj 2011.

Kursplaner finns här:
http://edu.bth.se/utbildning/utb_kursplan.asp?Kurskod=FI2401&RevisionsNr=3&f
ormat=pdf

http://edu.bth.se/utbildning/utb_kursplan.asp?kurskod=FI2402&revisionsnr=2&f
ormat=pdf

Du hittar mer information om innehåll, tidigare utvärderingar och ett första
schemaförslag på
http://www.filosofibth.org/FID005/FID005KursInfo.html

ntresseanmälan (icke bindande) sänder Du enklast till mig med länken nedan:
mailto:bro@bth.se?subject=Vetenskapsfilosofi.Intresseanmälan


Research Evidence – Assessment, Generation and Synthesis

7.5 ECTS. The course will address research challenges in relation to evidence. It is built around a set of discussion seminars and assignments. More details about the course can be found through the course program, which we would be happy to distribute if you are interested. Please drop an e-mail to either Ania Willman or Claes Wohlin.

The course is scheduled to start in September 2010 and end in January 2011. We plan to accept 10-12 PhD students (preferably from several different research fields to get good discussions and hence a deeper understanding and appreciation of research evidence).

See announcement here.


Theoretical Aspects in Computer Science

(offered spring or fall 2010, depending upon interest)

Level: graduate students, possibly open to upper level undergraduate students in Computer Science and Mathematics

Number of credits: 7.5 (two modules consisting of 4.5 and 3 credits)

Aims:

The course will provide a good understanding of:

  • Computability
  • NP theory
  • Approximation algorithms
  • Multiprocessor scheduling
  • Optimal performance bounds

Contents:

The course will cover areas from the theory of computation as well as some related applied topics.

The Turing machine model as the universal model of computation will be introduced. The  fundamental implications on computability and uncomputability will be covered. This will lead into complexity results such as polynomial time computability (the class P) and intractable problems. The class NP will of course be central in the presentation because of its fame and virtue. In fact the P ("easy to find") vs. NP ("easy to check") problem, challenging both mathematicians and computer scientists for decades, is one of the seven 1$ million Millenium Prize Problems <http://www.claymath.org/millennium/P_vs_NP/>.

Approximation algorithms for NP-hard and other intractable problems will be covered. A second course module will focus on applications particularly on multiprocessor scheduling for high performance supercomputing and for real-time systems with guaranteed worst-case performance. This module will also discuss optimal performance bounds on NP-hard problems.

The two modules can be taken independently of each other. However, taking them in the order described above will provide a deeper understanding of the interplay between the theoretical foundation and results from more applied fields. Tentatively, the two modules will earn 4 credits respectively 3.5 credits.

Implementation:

The course should be offered once every two or three years so that each student has a possibility to follow the course. The two modules can be given during different terms. The course should be given as a campus course and can be co-scheduled as distance education.

Responsible: Prof. Bengt Aspvall, Prof. Lars Lundberg, both at School of Computing, BTH


Advanced Research Topic

This is a 7.5 hp course for Ph.D. students. There is a limitation of 8 students chosen within the technical area. Responsible for the course will be Keith Clark at Imperial College, London, see Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keith_Clark. Keith will give 8 lectures in April/May 2010 and hold 4-5 individual meeting with each student based on practices from Cambridge and Imperial College. The local course administrator is Bengt Carlsson bca@bth.se who will arrange the course details and also be responsible for accepting students for the course. So please send an e-mail to Bengt if you are interested in joining the course.


Doctorate course in Engineering Education Research

February - October, 2010

The course aims at promoting participants´ understanding of the EERfield as a whole, covering issues such as relevant literature in EER, current EE research subfields, samples of research questions, EER and other fields of science, how to carry out research in EER and designing research projects.

The course is directed to two groups: 1) Doctoral students who wish to specialize in Engineering Education Research and pursue doctoral studies and research in EER. 2) Teachers and scholars in Engineering who wish to pursue researchin Engineering Education and deepen their understanding of relevant aspects of high quality Engineering Education.

In this context, we wish to define Engineering Education in a broad sense. Engineering sciences cover many different areas in technology, but engineering studies also include for example mathematics, physics, chemistry and computer science. Therefore we also welcome people who have been working or aim at working in for example mathematics education research, physics education research, chemistry education research or computing education research, and thus we hope to bring these communities closer to each other.

After the course, the student should be capable of designing a research plan for his or her own research project in EER.

The course will organized during February - October 2010 in several intensive days concentrating on difference aspects of EER.

There is no course fee. The course is funded by NordForsk, and accepted participants from Nordic and Baltic countries may apply for a grant covering the traveling and lodging costs. Participants from other countries are welcome but they are not eligible for applying the grant.

Organizers

The course is organized and taught jointly by:

- Computer Science Education Research Group (COMPSER), Helsinki University of Technology, Finland
- Uppsala Computing Education Research Group (UpCERG), Uppsala University, Sweden
- Advanced Research in Technology, Engineering Education and Science, Aalborg University, Denmark.

For more information see the course web site: http://www.it.uu.se/research/group/upcerg/EER


Various Summer Courses at CEU

Central European University in Budapest offers several courses. The general application deadline is February 15, 2010 (unless specified otherwise on the course web site). Applicants are encouraged to apply online: http://www.sun.ceu.hu/03-application/howto_apply.php

More information on the courses and the application procedure are available at http://www.sun.ceu.hu/02-courses/by-title.php. Please feel free to contact the SUN office with questions at summeru@ceu.hu .

Course Title: Theoretical Aspects in Computer Science

Level: graduate students, possibly open to upper level
undergraduate students in Computer Science and Mathematics

Number of credits: 7.5 (two modules consisting of 4.5
respectively 3 credits each)

Aims:

The course will provide a good understanding of

* Computability
* NP theory
* Approximation algorithms
* Multiprocessor scheduling
* Optimal performance bounds

Contents:

The course will cover areas from the theory of computation
as well as some related applied topics.

The Turing machine model as the universal model of
computation will be introduced. The fundamental implications
on computability and uncomputability will be covered. This
will lead into complexity results
such as polynomial time computability (the class P) and
intractable problems. The class NP will of course be central
in the presentation because of its fame and virtue. In fact
the P ("easy to find") vs. NP ("easy to check") problem,
challenging both mathematicians and computer
scientists for decades, is one of the seven 1$ million
Millenium Prize Problems
<http://www.claymath.org/millennium/P_vs_NP/>.

Approximation algorithms for NP-hard and other intractable
problems will be covered. A second course module will focus
on applications particularly on multiprocessor scheduling
for high performance supercomputing and for real-time
systems with guaranteed worst-case performance. This module
will also discuss optimal performance bounds on NP-hard
problems.

The two modules can be taken independently of each other.
However, taking them in the order described above will
provide a deeper understanding of the interplay between the
theoretical foundation and results from more applied fields.
Tentatively, the two modules will earn
4 credits respectively 3.5 credits.

Implementation:

The course should be offered once every two or three years
so that each student has a possibility to follow the course.
The two modules can be given during different terms.

The course should be given as a campus course and can be
co-scheduled as distance education.

Responsible: Prof. Bengt Aspvall, Prof. Lars Lundberg, both
at School of Computing, BTH

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